Haitians are continuing their protest against results of the 25 October election after the Provisional Electoral Council (CEP) confirmed that government-backed candidate Jovenel Moise will face Jude Celestin, the former head of Haiti's state construction company, in a run-off vote in December.

Protests have become almost a daily occurrence in Port-au-Prince as political parties across the board charge that the ruling party – led by outgoing president Michel Martelly – tainted the vote with massive fraud. Violent protests in the Haitian capital have left at least one person dead.

Haiti election
Haitian police arrest a demonstrator with machetes at the end of a march in Port-au-Prince, on 26 November 2015Hector Retamal/AFP

A poll by an independent research group found deep public suspicion of the first round of the presidential election. A poll taken after preliminary results were announced on 5 November found that nearly 90% disagreed with the statement: "As far as I can see, this election is fair, there is no fraud."

The poll also came up with a curious result when voters were asked who they voted for among the 54 names on the ballot. Just over 6% said they voted for government-backed candidate Jovenel Moise, placing him fourth. Yet he came first with nearly 33% of the vote.

Haiti election
A man covering his head with a T-shirt marches against the results of the presidential elections in Port-au-PrinceAndres Martinez Casares/Reuters
Haiti election
A supporter of presidential candidate Moise Jean-Charles stands in front of a burning tyre during protests after the announcement of the results of the presidential electionAndres Martinez Casares/Reuters
Haiti election
Police arrest a demonstrator carrying machetes in Port-au-Prince, on 26 November 2015Hector Retamal/AFP
Haiti election
Supporters of the Fanmi Lavalas and Petit Dessalines political parties protest against the results given by the Provisional Electoral Council in Port-au-PrinceHector Retamal/AFP
Haiti election
A Haitian policeman aims his gun during clashes with demonstrators in Port-au-Prince, on 24 November 2015Hector Retamal/AFP
Haiti election
Men detained by Haitian police lie in the bed of a truck in Port-au-Prince, on 24 November 2015Hector Retamal/AFP
Haiti election
Journalists take cover as Haitian police break up a protest in Port-au-Prince on 18 November 2015Hector Retamal/AFP
Haiti election
A man jumps on an election poster of presidential candidate Jovenel Moise in Port-au-Prince on 11 November 2015Hector Retamal/AFP

Third-place candidate Moise Jean-Charles, who won 14%, alleged that ballot papers supporting him had been destroyed. According to the Miami Herald, a coalition of electoral observers presented a report that blamed the CEP for leaving the vote open to fraud by not ensuring the security of the ballots and handing almost a million accreditation cards to political party monitors and observers.

Haiti election
Burned ballot papers are seen in an abandoned house's backyard in Delmas, Port-au-Prince, on 29 October 2015Hector Retamal/AFP
Haiti election
Supporters of presidential candidate Moise Jean-Charles protest in front a house where burned ballot papers were foundHector Retamal/AFP

Martelly's party has denied accusations that it manipulated the voting or the ballot count. The electoral council has set 27 December as the date of the run-off but the current instability threatens that date. Haiti, the poorest nation in the western hemisphere, has struggled for decades to establish a solid, transparent government free of corruption.