James Anderson
James Anderson is now just four adrift of Curtly Ambrose on the list of cricket's most prolific test bowlers.Getty Images

James Anderson made history as the first English bowler and only the 12th ever to reach the impressive milestone of 400 test wickets as New Zealand closed an eventful day one of the second test at Headingley on 297-8.

After bad weather had delayed the start until after lunch, England captain Alastair Cook won the toss and sensibly elected to field first in light of the treacherous batting conditions.

Play eventually got underway at 1330 and Anderson, who surpassed Sir Ian Botham as England's all-time leading test wicket-taker during the tour of West Indies in April, wasted little time in securing his next significant achievement as he had Martin Guptill caught by Ian Bell at slip for a duck with only the eighth ball of the match.

Another short break followed as the notoriously unpredictable Yorkshire weather continued to wreak havoc with the schedule, but Anderson struck again shortly after proceedings reconvened with an expert swinging delivery that Kane Williamson could only edge behind to the grateful Jos Buttler.

With the tourists flagging badly on 22-3, opener Tom Latham was initially given out after the umpire deemed he had befallen the same fate, although the decision was subsequently overturned following a smart review.

Ross Taylor was trapped lbw by Stuart Broad after a third stoppage but Brendon McCullum then temporarily steadied the ship and ensured that his side suffered no further losses before tea at 123-3.

The stylish New Zealand captain fell for 41 with the first action of the evening session after being caught by Mark Wood off Ben Stokes and the former, making only his second appearance for England, then claimed the wicket of BJ Watling.

That dismissal brought debutant Luke Ronchi to the crease. The 34-year-old performed with real panache and together with Latham, who was dropped no less than three times in a period of eight deliveries by Wood, Gary Ballance and Cook, looked to inspire a fight back.

Despite their obvious confidence, however, neither player managed to make a century as Latham was finally dislodged after being caught by Root at slip and Ronchi ended a fine innings with a 70-ball 88 when he hooked Broad to Anderson stationed at fine leg.

Tim Southee was sent packing for one when he sent a shot soaring high into the air that was eventually snaffled by Adam Lyth on the boundary.

Matt Henry and Mark Craig successfully negotiated the rest of the day's play with their respective wickets still intact as New Zealand scored close to 300 runs from just 65 overs.