Outrage In Missouri Town After Police Shooting
Missouri Governor Jay Nixon speaks about the unrest in the town of Ferguson following the shooting of Michael Brown.Getty Images

Missouri Governor, Jay Nixon, has called on the Missouri State Highway Patrol to replace the St. Louis Police department and take the lead in managing the law and order situation in Ferguson.

"Ferguson will not be defined as a community that was torn apart by violence, but will be known as a community that pulled together to overcome it," said Nixon at a news conference.

"My message to the people of Ferguson is: these messages have been heard," added Nixon.

After four days of unrest in the St. Louis suburb, following Saturday's (9 August) shooting of unarmed 18-year-old Michael Brown by an unnamed police officer, Nixon said security will now be overseen by Capt. Ron Johnson of the Highway Patrol, as Ferguson has started to resemble a "war zone".

Capt. Ron Johnson, who grew up in the community said: "It means a lot to me personally that we break this cycle of violence."

After crowds took to the streets of Ferguson in protest after Saturday's shooting of Brown, police have been heavily criticized for using tear gas and smoke bombs to contain the protest.

US President, Barack Obama has also appealed for the crowds to maintain "peace and calm" on the streets, while admitting that there is no excuse for the use of excessive force by police in the aftermath of the shooting.

Obama also condemned the Wednesday (13 August) night arrest of the two reporters from the Huffington Post and Washington Post.

"Here in the United States of America, police should not be bullying or arresting journalists who are just trying to do their jobs."

Obama has asked the FBI and Justice Department to investigate the shooting of Michael Brown.

Eyewitnesses said Brown had his arms raised and was shot multiple times by a police officer, while police claim there was a struggle and the officer suffered several injuries.

The officer's name and picture was released on Twitter by the online hacktivist group @TheAnonMessage, however St. Louis County police dismissed the claims by addressing the Anonymous account directly on Twitter. Shortly after, Twitter suspended the group's account.

Authorities are holding off on releasing the officer's name until investigations are over, in an effort to protect him and his family from possible reprisals.