Hundreds of refugees and migrants have been evicted from a decommissioned secondary school in Paris, ending a four-month stand-off over their use of the building. Officers cordoned off the area before dawn as the inhabitants, including refugees from Afghanistan, Eritrea and other trouble spots, were put onto buses. Police at the scene declined to comment on the operation or say where the evicted migrants were being taken.

migrants Paris school
Migrants and refugees gather in the courtyard as they wait to be evicted from the Lycee Jean-Quarre, an empty secondary school in the 19th district in ParisPhilippe Wojazer/Reuters
migrants Paris school
French police evict migrants and refugees from the Lycee Jean-QuarrePhilippe Wojazer/Reuters
migrants Paris school
Migrants wait for buses after being evicted by French authorities from a disused school in ParisDominique Faget/AFP
migrants Paris school
Buses arrive to carry away the migrants just evicted from the empty secondary schoolPhilippe Wojazer/Reuters
migrants Paris school
Migrants and refugees gather to board buses after their evacuation from the Lycee Jean-QuarrePhilippe Wojazer/Reuters

About 100 people moved into the empty Lycee Jean-Quarre building in the capital's northern 19th arrondissement in July and numbers soon climbed to more than 700. In September, a French court gave them a month to leave the premises, which city authorities had been hoping to renovate to turn into a temporary refugee shelter and, eventually, a library.

Authorities said they were launching the evacuation "to deal with the humanitarian emergency and give [refugees] dignified conditions," Paris Region Police Commissioner Jean-Francois Carenco told local media that upon leaving the building, some migrants shouted: "[Identity] papers for all!" and "Fewer police, more [identity] papers!". In France, illegal immigrants are known as "sans papiers" (without papers).

migrants Paris school
The Lycee Jean Quarre (C), an empty secondary school occupied by hundreds of migrants and asylum seekers, is seen in the 19th district in ParisPhilippe Wojazer/Reuters
migrants Paris school
A man walks past graffiti on a stairwell at the schoolPhilippe Wojazer/Reuters
migrants Paris school
Nasrullah, from Afghanistan, is seen putting up French signs in a classroom at the empty secondary school on 22 OctoberPhilippe Wojazer/Reuters
migrants Paris school
Sudanese migrant Abdelhamid is seen with a megaphone as he stands near his mattress in a corridor of the abandoned school on 22 OctoberPhilippe Wojazer/Reuters
migrants Paris school
Laundry hangs on a washing line in a courtyard at the schoolPhilippe Wojazer/Reuters
migrants Paris school
Sudanese migrants are pictured in their bedroom at the empty school in the 19th Arrondisement of Paris the day before they were evictedPhilippe Wojazer/Reuters
migrants Paris school
A sign saying 'Refugees welcome' is seen painted on the school buildingPhilippe Wojazer/Reuters
migrants Paris school
Afghan refugees are pictured making bread in a room at the Lycee Jean-Quarre on 22 OctoberPhilippe Wojazer/Reuters

In September, President Francois Hollande said France would welcome 24,000 refugees as part of a European Union-wide plan that "can and will" bring the refugee crisis under control. France has received far fewer migrants than Eastern Europe and Germany. Those who come tend to congregate in Calais, hoping to get to Britain.