Supermoon
A so-called supermoon appears 12 to 14 percent bigger and 30 times brighter than a normal full moon   (Reuters)

People around the world have witnessed this year's first "supermoon," a full moon that appears bigger and brighter as it comes closer to Earth. Stargazers around the world captured some stunning images of the first celestial phenomenon on 29 August.

The supermoon was seen across the world but it was first seen on Australia's east coast just as it rose, while the rest of the country and the world waited longer for a glimpse of it. In some of the pictures, the Tycho crater -- caused by the impact of an asteroid millions of years ago -- was visible.

The supermoon appears 12 to 14 percent bigger and 30 times brighter than normal because it is much closer to Earth. According to Space.com, we see only three to four supermoons in a year. Each of them appears in different sizes and levels of brightness. The next supermoon is only a month away, on 29 September.

Here are some of pictures of the supermoon clicked and posted by stargazers around the world with hashtags like #SuperMoon2015, #supermoon and #sturgeonmoon.