Tim Peake was rocketed to the International Space Station (ISS) for expeditions 46 and 47 on 15 December 2015. He launched successfully at 11:03 GMT from Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on board Soyuz TMA-19M and will be spending six months on the ISS along with commander Tim Copra, flight engineer Jeff Williams (US) and flight engineers Oleg Skripochka, Yuri Malenchenko and Alexey Ovchinin (Russia).

The former regular British Army Air Corps officer participated in the first spacewalk outside the ISS by a British astronaut on 15 January 2016. The purpose of the spacewalk was to replace a faulty sequential shunt unit on the station's solar arrays.

Tim Peake
The Soyuz spacecraftESA/NASA
Tim Peake
Tim Peake during his 4 hour 43 minute spacewalk to replace a failed power regulator and install cablingESA/NASA
Tim Peake
Utah’s capital Salt Lake City, seen on the left, sits at 1300m, bordered by the waters of the Great Salt Lake and the peaks of the Wasatch Range that rise over 1.6 km above the valley floorESA/NASA

The International Space Station travels at 28,800 km/h (18,000 mph) meaning that it only takes 90 minutes to circle the Earth. During the next orbit the Station moves around 2200km (1,367 miles) to the west, in relation to its previous position.

Astronauts are able to use digital cameras for taking photos by setting up the camera to take an image every few seconds, before playing the images back quickly, creating a time-lapse effect.

On 6 March, Tim Peake made a time lapse of an aurora, stating that "an aurora was photobombed by the International Space Station's solar array in this time-lapse".

Tim Peake
Mellit in SudanESA/NASA

In his latest interview on 19 March, Peake explained how gyroscopes can be used to keep spacecraft stable during his six-month Principia mission. Satellites track their pointing direction using the same approach as on submarines and aircraft aided by fast-spinning gyroscopes that maintain a fixed orientation in the same way as a child's spinning top.

On camera Peake allowed a small gyroscope to float in space gravity, before spinning it. He demonstrated how it would not stop spinning when it was touched and that it 'remained in the same plane [orientation]' even when it moved, giving us an insight into the way the ISS uses gyro stabilisation to control its position. The International Space Station has four big gyroscopes that are used for the stabilisation of the station.

Tim Peake
Sao PauloESA/NASA
Tim Peake
Tim Peake inside the International Space StationESA/NASA
Tim Peake
Stars in the UniverseESA/NASA
Tim Peake
Image taken over Tunisia, looking south-east, towards Libya. Gulf of Gabes and Boughrara Gulf on the leftESA/NASA
Tim Peake
Spheres experiment: testing algorithms for complex docking operationsESA/NASA
Tim Peake
The Moon seen from the International Space StationESA/NASA
Tim Peake
Tim Peake took this picture during his 4 hour 43 minute spacewalk to replace a failed power regulator and install cablingESA/NASA
Tim Peake
South Africa from the Space Station's EarthKAMESA/NASA
Tim Peake
Expedition 46 Soyuz Approaches Space Station for Docking. Russian cosmonaut Yuri Malenchenko manually docked the Soyuz TMA-19M spacecraft to the International Space Station's Rassvet module after an initial automated attempt was abortedNASA
Tim Peake
Tim Peake captured this photo on 29 January 2016 from the ISS, as the robotic arm in Japan's Kibo laboratory successfully deployed two combined satellites from Texas universitiesESA/NASA
Tim Peake
Lightning strikes illuminating clouds over Western Australia during a thunderstormESA/NASA
Tim Peake
The Spacecraft hub, showing how close the spacecrafts Soyuz and the Cygnus are to each otherESA/NASA
Tim Peake
The aurora as seen from the International Space StationESA/NASA
Tim Peake
My ringside-seat view of the spacewalk EVA 34 – taken from the cupolaESA/NASA
Tim Peake
The Space Station Flyover of the MediterraneanESA/NASA
Tim Peake
The ISS records Earth with a blue glow just before dawnESA/NASA
Tim Peake
An active auroraESA/NASA
Tim Peake
An iceberg, about the same size as London, drifts off AntarcticaESA/NASA
Tim Peake
"Every so often our orbit lets us enjoy a longer sunrise and sunset − more time to capture the spectacular colours!"ESA/NASA
Tim Peake
Tim Peake prepares for a spacewalk, also known as extra-vehicular activity (EVA)ESA/NASA
Tim Peake
A glacial river water flowing from this Patagonian ice fieldESA/NASA
Tim Peake
London, UK, as seen from the International Space Station 400km above EarthESA/NASA
Tim Peake
Himalayan valley under a full moonESA/NASA
Tim Peake
The morning sun hits active volcanoes in GuatemalaESA/NASA
Tim Peake
Tim Peake during his 4 hour 43 minute spacewalk to replace a failed power regulator and install cablingESA/ NASA
Tim Peake
The Canary Islands, one of the first images taken from Sentinel-3A’s Sea and Land Surface Temperature Radiometer (SLSTR)ESA/NASA
Tim Peake
A sea of green fishing boats lights up the nightESA/NASA
Tim Peake
A cloudy Rio de JaneiroESA/NASA
Tim Peake
Tim Peake juggles with fresh fruit following the arrival of his new crewmates on the International Space StationESA/NASA
Tim Peake
Green streaks of auroraESA/NASA
Tim Peake
Tim Peake practices a Cygnus capture ahead of the Orbital launchESA/NASA
Tim Peake
31 December 2015: The west coast of Canada from the International Space StationESA/NASA
Tim Peake
Cygnus captureESA/NASA
Tim Peake
15 January 2016: Tim Peake prepares his Extravehicular Mobility Unit spacesuit ahead of a spacewalk with NASA astronaut Timothy Kopra to replace a failed voltage regulator, to return power to one of eight power channels. The spacewalk was a successESA/NASA
Tim Peake
AfricaESA/NASA