Disney to hire intern to counter threats such as terrorism and cyber-attacks
Disneyland in California and Walt Disney World in Florida are designated “national defense airspace”Reuters

Media and entertainment conglomerate, The Walt Disney Company (TWDC) is scouting for a Global Intelligence Analyst Intern, who would work at its headquarters at Burbank, California. The candidate will join its "Counter Threat" intelligence support team, from spring of 2016, to counter terror threats and cyberattacks.

The team provides provides "strategic intelligence, threat assessments, vulnerability mitigation strategies and in-depth analytical products covering existing and developing threats that include counter terrorism, physical threats, cyber-attacks and all reputational risks to TWDC, its affiliated business units, facilities, guests and employees," the company's corporate website states.

The basic qualifications required by applicants include, "[The] ability to write and do research, knowledge of MS Office, an interest in international relations apart from a sense of teamwork."

The job would involve "[providing] timely and relevant intelligence that is critical to supporting and informing corporate executives, key business leaders, and security and safety personnel at all levels of TWDC – worldwide."

Last year, Sony Pictures Entertainment experienced a cyber attack that exposed employees' personal information, erased files and even forced it to publicly abandon an projects estimated at $80m (£51.7m,€70.3m). Disney's role for the new intern could be to beef up its cyber security.

Further, considering that millions of people visit Disney's parks each year, it is no surprise that the entertainment company is concerned about security. In 2003, after the company contributed a huge amount financially for the Iraq war, a strict no-fly zone restriction was imposed on two of its large theme parks namely, Disneyland in California and Walt Disney World in Florida, which even to-date are officially designated "national defense airspace".