Danny Ings
Ings is available for a nominal fee at the end of the season.Getty Images

On Wednesday night (11 February), Old Trafford played host to the upcoming summer transfer window's hottest available property, but Radamel Falcao and Robin van Persie – the regressing Manchester United pair – he is not.

Though Harry Kane's goal splurge at Tottenham Hotspur makes him the most in-form forward in the Premier League, Daniel Levy's stubbornness in negotiation makes the Chingford-born player unavailable following his breakthrough campaign at White Hart lane.

Burnley's Danny Ings, is a completely different story. Out of contract at the end of the season, the 22-year-old will be available for a fee which in terms of the current market, is nominal. The Clarets want upwards of £6.5m for the England hopeful.

While playing for a team consigned to a relegation battle in the Premier League, Ings' feats this season are nothing short of remarkable. Nine goals, 38% of Burnley's league tally, have come in 22 appearances this term while Ings remains as dangerous as he did during his Football League upbringing.

In fact the most impressive facet of the England Under-21 international's step into the top flight has been how the manner and traits of his performances have not changed, or been compromised by the increase in standard. He refreshingly remains the same pacey, dangerous schemer which formed the basis for his impressive reputation in the leagues below.

Those characteristics don't just make Ings a natural goalscorer who relies on service and instinct alone but one who makes opportunities for himself and is a livewire in attack. In other words, Europe's biggest sides should be taking note of a player who can be a valuable asset.

Danny Ings
Nine goals, 38% of Burnley's league tally, have come in 22 appearances this term while Ings remains as dangerous as he did during his Football League upbringingGetty Images

There remains little value in the modern-day transfer market warped by inflated fees and greedy agents, overly-ambitious owners and clamour for success. Ings however represents a rarity - a player available for next to nothing who has proved himself able to spearhead any attack on the continent.

Liverpool, the club which Ings has been most often linked with, are expected to be in the market for a striker come the end of the campaign. Fabio Borini's days are numbered, Mario Balotelli's first season has been a disaster, and Daniel Sturridge's fitness cannot be relied upon.

Brendan Rodgers will have two options available to him. Sign a marquee player which will capture the imagination of supporters and be billed as the man to inspire a title charge, or make the low-key, shrewd addition of Ings with Liverpool's spare change and continue to build a squad with a glut of youthful exuberance.

The result will be an accurate indication of Rodgers' prowess in the market. The former represents temporary glory and maximum expectation, the latter belief and a perception of value. Decision day is fast approaching.