Hundreds of demonstrators took to the streets of Vienna on Saturday to protest against the far right presidential candidate, Norbert Hofer.

Protestors in the Austrian capital carried banners bearing the message: "No Nazi in the Hofberg."

Polls suggest the result of Sunday's election will be tight, showing the growing political polarisation in Europe. Hofer stands against independent candidate Alexander Van der Bellen, who is supported by the Green Party.

Hofer, 45, represents the Austrian Freedom Party – a right-wing political group established in the 1950s by Nazi sympathisers.

The party sits in the European Parliament's Europe of Nations and Freedom (ENF) group. The ENF group is attended by members of far-right French political party Front National, and chaired by the candidate in the 2017 French Presidential election, Marine le Pen.

However, party colleague Andreas Rabl defended Hofer as Austrians took to the streets carrying "F**k Hofer" signs.

The Mail Online quotes Rabl as saying: "The foreign report about radicalism and the far-right in Austria, I hear that all of the time. I ask myself, what are they talking about?

"New fascism? I do not see it. Mr Hofer as president would have the opportunity to correct this view. We are a normal right-wing party, correct. But we are a far cry from the Nazi party."

The pan-German party takes a strong anti-immigration stance, the popularity of which has been seen in a number of European countries and will become a key issue in a number of key elections, including those in France and the Netherlands.

Austria has, as with many European countries, expressed concerns over the growing number of migrants passing through as the attempt to get to Germany.

Hofer, who is pro-gun and says he understands the increasing number of Austrians carrying firearms amid uncertain times, was criticised for wearing a cornflower – a Nazi symbol – in his lapel.

He has also openly expressed anti-Islamic sentiments, stating there is "no place for Islam" in Austria.

If Hofberg wins, he will become Europe's first far-right head of state since the Second World War, and could further threaten the stability of the EU.

Voting closes at 5pm local time (4pm GMT) on Sunday, December 4, and the results will be known at around 11pm (10pm GMT).

Van der Bellen Norbert Hofer
Independent candidate Alexander Van der Bellen stands against the far-right's Norbert Hofer in the Austrian presidential election Getty