Charlie Hebdo
Issues of French satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo are displayed during the exhibition 'Une histoire de Charlie hebdo' ('A History of Charlie Hebdo') in tribute to the French cartoonists killed during the attack on the offices of Charlie Hebdo which left twelve dead on January 7, at Le Musee de la Bande Dessinee in Angouleme, western France, on January 28, 2015.Getty Images

French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo is once again in the news over its controversial cartoons. Its latest cartoon features drowned Syrian refugee toddler Aylan Kurdi lying in the water while men with pig-like noses are seen running after a woman with a caption: "What would little Aylan have grown up to be if he had lived? A groper in Germany."

The cartoon allegedly refers to the Cologne New Year's Eve mass sexual assaults by men of North African and Arab appearance. A total of 90 women were reportedly sexually harassed and robbed outside the city's iconic Gothic cathedral on 31 December, according to police.

Earlier, the magazine had published another cartoon of a refugee boy next to what appeared to be Jesus Christ, with the caption reading: "Christians walk on water while Muslim children drown." The magazine later defended the cartoon saying it was intended to bring to attention the hypocrisy of the European authorities.

Black-clad gunmen armed with automatic weapons stormed the headquarters of the satirical magazine in Paris on 7 January 2015 killing two police officers and 10 journalists. French President Francois Hollande condemned the attack as "barbaric".

The Vatican newspaper Osservatore Romano recently condemned the French satirical magazine's cover page published on the first anniversary of the attack on the publication, which shows a bearded God-figure in sandals holding a Kalashnikov over his shoulder. The caption reads: "One year on: the killer is still at large." The magazine has previously created uproar in the Muslim community over its controversial Prophet Mohammed cartoons.