charlie Hebdo
A sign at a newsstand notifies the latest edition of French satirical magazine 'Charlie Hebdo' has sold out on January 14, 2015 in Nimes, France. An initial three million copies of the controversial magazine were printed in the wake of last week's terrorist attacks. Another two million of the magazine is scheduled for printing.Getty Images

Five million copies are being produced of the satirical Charlie Hebdo magazine, after the first run sold out in hours on Wednesday (14 January).

A week after militants attacked the Charlie Hebdo headquarters in Paris and held several people hostage at a kosher supermarket, Charlie Hebdo's survivors' issue hit newsstands today (14 January).

The latest edition features the Prophet Mohammed holding a sign saying "I am Charlie" with the tagline "All is forgiven".

An unsigned editorial featured in the magazine read: "We thank from the bottom of our heart all those individuals and organisations who are sincerely and profoundly Charlie. They know who they are."

While the weekly magazine usually prints an estimated 60,000 copies, it was announced that the print run will be increased from three to five million to satisfy the high demand.

The survivors' issue has been circulated across 25 countries and is available in six languages, including Arabic, English and Turkish.

A spokeswoman from AirFrance confirmed the airline has purchased 20,000 copies of the survivors' issue and said: "They have been located in the lounges and boarding areas of both Paris airports (Charles de Gaulle and Orly) for passengers who wish to take a copy," reported The Independent.

The survivors' issue was compiled by the surviving Charlie Hebdo team members in the offices of the French daily newspaper Libération.

Surviving columnist, Mathieu Madenian, has described his colleagues as an "improbable collection of sex-mad cartoonists, economists, anti-globalists and priest-eaters, united in their determination to laugh and to expose, and above all, addicted to the pleasure of displeasing."

Proceeds from the sale of the new issue are planned to go towards the victims' families.

Meanwhile, Yemen's top al-Qaeda leader Sheikh Nasr al-Ansi has claimed responsibility for the Charlie Hebdo attack.

In a video message, al-Ansi said: "The one who chose the target, laid plan and financed the operation is leadership of al-Qaeda in Arabian Peninsula. We claim responsibility for this operation as a vengeance for the Messenger of Allah.

"Stop your insults on our Prophet and sanctities. Stop spilling our blood. Leave our lands. Quit plundering our resources."

Charlie Hebdo
charlie Hebdo
A sign at a newsstand notifies the latest edition of French satirical magazine 'Charlie Hebdo' has sold out on January 14, 2015 in Nimes, France.Getty Images