Refugees in Germany
Elderly man believed to be the oldest asylum seeker arrives in Germany after month-long travel from Afghanistan.Getty Images

A 110-year-old man who has arrived in Germany to seek asylum is believed to be the oldest refugee to date to enter the country. The man, identified as Abdul Qadir Azizi, took the help of a walking stick to make his way to the country, arriving with eight family members.

Azizi, supported by his 60-year-old sister arrived in Passau on 29 September. He reportedly spent nearly a month travelling, along with his other family members that included four children and a pregnant woman, before they reached the Bavarian border town.

"We have met some rugged types crossing the border in the hope of a better life but this tops everything. He is quite a remarkable man. The man is the head of a four-generations clan," said a local police official, reported Express.

Azizi said he had decided for his family to flee his hometown, Baghlan, in northern Afghanistan since it had become "unsafe". Speaking to the Red Cross volunteers through an interpreter, the man said three of his brothers had been killed by the Taliban militants.

"We wanted to get to a land where we can be sure that when we go to sleep at night we might be able to wakeup safely the next morning," said the man.

The elderly man was reportedly carried in turns by the younger men in the family through several countries before the family could reach Germany. "Even if the man is 90, that trip was one heck of a journey," said police spokesman Werner Straubinger, reported The Local.

An endless stream of people pulling suitcases are seen arriving at the Central Registration Office for Asylum Seekers of the State Office for Health and Social Services, which is the registration office for refugees and migrants arriving in Berlin who are seeking asylum in Germany.

Meanwhile, a Syrian refugee girl's drawing depicting her life before and after her escape from war has gone viral in Germany. The drawing was gifted to a German police officer in Passau.

Germany is expecting a total of 800,000 refugees by the end of 2015. About a third of the asylum seekers are lying about their Syrian origins, according to a Germany interior ministry.