Calais Jungle
A riot policeman apprehends a young man during a protest by refugees against the partial dismantlement of the camp for the "Jungle" camp in Calais, FrancePascal Rossignol/ Reuters

In 2015, France expelled or deported more than 10,500 migrants from its territory, including people seeking asylum from poverty or war that were eligible for refugee status, in a violation of international laws and conventions.

As the migrant crisis in the French port of Calais continues, French authorities have been carrying out their strongest crackdown on migrants for five years, arresting, detaining or deporting migrants from France.

Statistics from the Police Aux Frontières border police (PAF) show that dozens of migrants were deported out of France to other EU countries or their country of origin, despite coming from nations at war or where their lives were at risk.

As revealed by Le Parisien newspaper, PAF data that lists the nationality of persons subject to expulsion orders effectively obliging them to leave the French territory shows that French authorities declared illegal the presence of 19 Afghans, 11 Gambians, 10 Sudanese, eight Iranians, four Syrians and four Eritreans.

Commenting on the statistics, the French Interior Ministry insisted that not all migrants were sent back to their home country as some were sent to "any other legally admissible country". "The Syrians mentioned in these statistics were sent back to Egypt", a ministry spokesman was quoted as saying. "We instead like to speak about re-admission."

Calais migrants refugees asylum Britain
Ethiopian and Eritrean women and children attending an Orthodox Christian serviceRob Stothard/Getty

'These four Eritreans have been sentenced to death'

French organisation Cimade, which helps foreigners with their rights, meanwhile condemned the forced returns, in which dozens of migrants have been sent back to high-risk countries.

"We know that some Sudanese were sent home to Khartoum because the French authorities estimated the capital of Sudan did not present a particular danger. In reality, these people have probably suffered inhuman treatment upon arrival," David Rohi, responsible for Cimade's commission of deportation, was quoted as saying by l'Obs.

Deportations of Afghans, Sudanese and Eritreans violate the Article 3 of the European Convention on Human Rights, which provides that "No one shall be subjected to torture or to inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment.

"In Sudan, as in Syria or Eritrea, refugees who fled their country are exposed, when they return to torture or executions," he added. "If they have indeed been handed over to authorities in their countries, these four Eritreans have been sentenced to death."

These returns also go against terms outlined in the Dublin III Regulation, an EU law that allows migrants to be returned to the EU member state responsible for examining an individual's asylum application – the one through which he or she first entered into the EU, most commonly known as 'first EU country of entry'. For instance, if a Sudanese asylum-seeker came to the EU via Italy and then travelled to France, they would likely be sent back to Italy to have their application examined, rather than Sudan.

Migrants evicted from Paris high-school
Sudanese refugees prepare beds in a corridor of the Lycee Jean Quarre, an empty secondary school occupied by hundreds of migrants and asylum-seekers since August 2015, in the 19th district in Paris on 22 October 2015Handout

'Inhumane' deportation operation to unclog Calais

A collective of associations, including Cimade, pointed to the inhuman nature of the French authorities' operation, which it claims was launched to unclog the infamous 'Jungle' migrant camp in Calais, aimed notably at the evacuation of nationals of countries at war.

"Eritreans, Sudanese and Syrians have received from the Calais prefecture an obligation to leave the country and then they were sent to detention centres all over France without knowing where they were going. They feared deportation," Rohi said. According to Rohi, the operation may have prevented migrants to apply for a refugee or asylum status - which he believes they could have been granted.

"These people were locked up even though they wanted to open a political asylum case. However, they have only a period of five days to do so in a detention centre while several months are needed to build up the case," he explained.

The French government, meanwhile, said it has been both speeding up the processing of asylum applications and deporting those who have no right to be in France, as a solution to the steady procession of refugees on its territory.