Ebola Halloween
Twitter

Ebola zombies, Ebola patients and faux protective gear seem to be the hot new favourites for this year's Halloween.

Social media outlets, like Twitter are buzzing with chatter over respirators and protective suits.

A physician's assistant in Philadelphia, Maria McKenna is not amused at the idea and says it, "definitely rubs me the wrong way. Normally I think that irony and humor is funny, but this thing with the costumes, is it really that funny? I mean, Ebola's not even under control yet."

Others aren't that critical. A costume site, BrandsOnSale is selling an 'Ebola Containment Suit Costume' for an estimated £50 together with a white suit that has 'Ebola' written all over it, along with a face shield, breathing mask, safety goggles and blue latex gloves.

The retailer's online product description next to the costume reads: "You are sure to be prepared if any outbreak happens at your Halloween party. This will literally be the most 'viral' costume of the year." Johnathon Weeks, the company's CEO says he has sold over a dozen costumes already in the first week following the 8 October launch.

"We don't stray away from anything that's current or controversial or anything like that. If I told you we had a toddler Isis costume in the works, your mouth would drop.

"I will definitely let you know when that goes on sale. I can tell you it will come complete with a fake machine gun," said Weeks. The owner of another costume seller in New York, Ricky's NYC, says he has an abundance of leftover yellow jumpsuits, rubber gloves and masks from the 'Breaking Bad' fever from last year that are sure to be used up for takes on Ebola.

"I wouldn't say we can see an uptick in sales. I'd say it's still chugging along because it's a good seller no matter what. But people are definitely asking about an Ebola-type costume," said Ricky's president Richard Parrott when asked about the leftover Breaking Bad suits.

In a way to mentally empower his staff for the Ebola costume sales, Parrott has decided to donate a portion of the sale revenue to help find a cure for the deadly outbreak that is slowly engulfing regions outside West Africa. "We felt like it probably crosses a line that we don't want to cross," added Parrott.