Richard Wright (2001-2002)

The heir to David Seaman for club and country was soon consigned to English football's scrapheap of failures. Arsenal were left rueing the £2m they paid for Wright in the summer of 2001 and after a horrid own goal against Charlton, injury in the Champions League saw his opportunities dwindle.

Emmanuel Eboue (2005-2011)

Perhaps a harsh inclusion but his influential role in Arsenal's trophy-less spell means he successfully fights off competition from Oleg Luzhny and Nelson Vivas. The 2008-09 season was the highlight of his ineptitude, which saw him substituted against Wigan after being booed by his own support.

Igors Stepanovs (2000-2004)

The most dithering defender in Arsenal's history. Initially signed to replace the then injured Tony Adams, the Latvian was the definition of a donkey at the back. His finest hour came in a 6-1 defeat against Manchester United, where he was perplexed by the movement of Dwight Yorke.

Pascal Cygan (2002-2006)

Inexplicably part of the Invicibles squad in the 2003-04 season, Cygan carved out a four year career at Arsenal, assisting attacks with subtle bouts of inefficient defending.

Andre Santos (2011-2013)

Wouldn't know positioning even if it hit him square on the nose. Terrifying for entirely different reasons at both ends of the pitch and gave a new meaning to the role of an attacking full-back. Swapping shirts with departed nemesis Robin van Persie confirmed his reputation in north London.

Denilson (2006-2013)

Another Brazilian but this time without the flair. Denilson didn't necessarily evoke disappointment but a mediocrity which will transcend decades in the Premier League. Without one enviable asset, he drifted into the wilderness and back to Brazil.

Emmanuel Frimpong (2011-2014)

Amid Arsenal's dazzling array of stars was for three years a Ghanaian international with scarily limited ability. Frimpong was a fighter according to Arsene Wenger, perhaps a reason behind his indiscretions on Twitter, but provided little else. Sent off on first league start and never looked back.

Junichi Inamoto (2001-2002)

When football meets marketing. Even at the time Inamoto's move to north London smacked of Arsenal's globalising efforts and after just four appearance in one season, it is all the more clear now. Measuring his impact would be tough.

Quincy Owusu-Abeyie (2003-2006)

The simply vast numbers emerging from the Arsenal academy dictated that many would sink and Owusu-Abeyie is among them. The Ghana international's career never improved after a fine for dealing with an illegal agent and fell deep in Thierry Henry's shadow.

Jose Antonio Reyes (2004-2007)

Arriving with a big reputation and for a big fee, Reyes was only a big disappointment for Arsenal. For seven years the club's record signing, Reyes struggled with the English game, homesickness and fitting himself into Arsenal's team. An FA Cup final red card defined his spell.

Francis Jeffers (2001-2004)

A 'what might have been' in English football No.365. When Everton's youngest ever goalscorer moved to Arsenal, Wenger thought he was buying a replacement for Ian Wright. Instead, he got a floundering excuse for a 'fox in the box'. Career in the gutter ever since.

Substitutes: Manuel Alumnia, Oleg Luzhny, Nelson Vivas, Sebastien Squillaci, Mikael Silvestre, Amaury Bischoff, Park Chu-Young.