Reality TV show has sparked claims that personality comes before talent as contestants include the Dalai Lama's personal photographer, a gay doctor, a prison governor and a Muslim woman who is the hot favourite to win.

Nadiya Jamir Hussain has the support of David Cameron to win the Great British Bake Off finale which is on BBC One at 8pm on 7 October. The PM thinks Nadiya is "cool under pressure" and will sit down with his children to watch the final after giving his party conference speech in Manchester.

Hussain was worried that her headscarf would be a problem for some viewers. She said: "I was a bit nervous that perhaps people would look at me, a Muslim in a headscarf, and wonder if I could bake." There have been racist comments towards her with tweets saying: "England is a joke."

She told the Radio Times: "Just because I'm not a stereotypical British person, it doesn't mean I am not into bunting, cake and tea. I'm just as British as anyone else, and I hope I have proved that."

Controversy is no stranger to the show, with judge Mary Berry receiving criticism for saying: "You don't want somebody who's judging cakes to be large," she told the Sunday Times food magazine.

"Or else people will say, 'Look what happens when you eat cake'. I eat carefully because people don't want to see a large person judging cakes."

Last week's semi-final saw 10.2 million viewers watch 19-year-old Flora Shedden getting her marching orders, with the final expected to be the biggest episode in the BBC show's history. The Daily Mail has attacked the final for its diversity, and said that if Shedden had made a 'chocolate mosque', she would not have been sent home.