Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn is expected to restate his anti-nuclear weapons stance when he addresses thousands of people at the 2016 Glastonbury festival in June. The left-winger has been invited by singer Billy Bragg to follow in Tony Benn's footsteps and make a speech on the Left Field stage.

The sold-out festival, which will be headlined by Coldplay, Adele and Muse, will take place between 22 and 26 June and coincide with the EU referendum on 23 June. Buddhist spiritual leader the Dalai Lama addressed music fans in 2015 and even Boris Johnson recited Homer's The Iliad at Glastonbury in 2000.

Corbyn's close ally and shadow chancellor John McDonnell has also been asked to attend the event. "Jeremy has long been a fan of Glastonbury, and is looking forward to attending as a guest of the CND [Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament] and the festival organisers," a spokesman for the Labour leader told The Mirror.

Corbyn revealed in the run-up to the 2015 Labour leader election that his favourite band was 60s blues rockers The Animals, but less is known around what he would do to promote music if he gained power at the 2020 general election.

The Islington MP believes every child should have the chance to learn an instrument or act on stage, as part of his arts manifesto unveiled during the Labour leadership contest.

"The arts and creative industries are the backbone of much of our cultural heritage, and I fear that under this government over the next five years this cultural heritage is under threat," the left-winger declared.

Corbyn has not said much about the proposal since he shocked his fellow MPs and the media by winning the Labour leadership election in September last year. But the Coalition Government first introduced music education hubs in 2012.

The national network of 123 local partnerships are designed to help children learn instruments across England. The Department for Education most recently committed £75m to the initiative for the 2016/17 year.