Jose Mourinho
Mourinho has been critical of certain players. Getty

Professional Footballers' Association (PFA) chief executive Gordon Taylor has aired his frustration with Jose Mourinho's recent public criticism of his Manchester United squad.

Following United's 3-1 win over Swansea City on Sunday 6 November, Mourinho suggested he was unhappy with the attitudes of some of his charges, commenting: "For the team, you have to do anything."

Mourinho insisted he only wanted players who were willing to put their "bodies on the line," having earlier revealed Luke Shaw and Chris Smalling had made themselves unavailable due to injury.

The former Chelsea manager also singled out Shaw for criticism following United's defeat to Watford in September, claiming the England international was at fault for the Hornets' second goal in a 3-1 defeat.

With Shaw and Smalling left out of the England squad ahead of internationals against Scotland and Spain, Gareth Southgate defended the United duo, with Taylor now warning Mourinho must show more empathy when dealing with the modern day footballer.

"I was disappointed with that because, knowing the individuals, they are both highly thought of," said Taylor.

"They have personal problems which I don't need to relate, but sometimes a manager needs to be a psychologist as well.

"Also, we're all human beings. That's why, with management these days, I'm not talking about being soft, I'm talking about being understanding."

He continued: "Very few make it in the game and those that do have real resolve and resilience. So we suggest that any player is being not as tough as he could be, those days are gone when we had no substitutes and with a broken leg you still carried on. Surely we've come beyond that."

Former Manchester United skipper Gary Neville has also voice his worries on Mourinho's comments. While he believes 21-year-old Shaw still needs to mature both physically and mentally, he was surprised by suggestions Smalling is not willing to give his all to the cause.

"I find it difficult to believe he has ever been anything other than completely committed to wanting to get out on the training pitch every day," Neville told Sky Sports.

"Having worked with him for four years he has always been incredibly impeccable and trustworthy, someone I always felt would run through a brick wall, so I am surprised by that one."