Rory McIlroy says he is a 'complete p***k' leading up to the Masters and is hoping to cope with the 'stressful situations' and make the Augusta National golf course his home. The 27-year-old has enjoyed tremendous success during his career so far and has won three of the four Majors, apart from the one on offer at Augusta.

The Northern Irishman has played 99 practice holes on the course so far and will play nine more before he gets his Masters campaign under way alongside Spain hotshot Jon Rahm and Japan's Hideto Tanihara at approximately 6:41pm on Thursday (6 April). The stress of trying to earn a green jacket has led to McIlroy preparing extensively, and he admits that he is not good company during the build-up one of golf's biggest events.

"I'm a complete p***k in the week leading up to Augusta," McIlroy told The Telegraph. "No, I am probably not much fun to be around, but they [his friends and family] understand and know that. It's a stressful situation."

Despite the added pressure of the Masters and the mental toil it predictably brings, McIlroy is in fine fettle, ready for the battle: "It's been a quiet build-up compared to previous years and I haven't minded that – it's been quite nice. I feel good, like my game is there. I feel ready to go," he told BBC Radio 5 live.

"I feel like I've done everything I can do to prepare. It's just a case of going out there and hitting the shots I need to."

McIlroy has become accustomed to the quirks and kinks of the Augusta National golf course and is pleased with his preparation leading up to the Masters. The world number two is aiming to join an elite group of golfers including Jack Nicklaus and Gary Player by achieving the career grand slam, and he believes all he has left to do is to let his 'subconscious take over'.

"The more you can make Augusta National feel like your home golf course, the better," McIlroy added. "I've played here a good bit in recent weeks. I've shot good scores and I feel like I know what I am doing here. It's all there.

"I know it's all there, it's just a matter of going out there and doing it. That's the difficult thing – it's almost like getting out of your own way and letting your subconscious take over."