Republicans in the US are turning on Roy Moore in their masses as they try to find a way to remove him from the upcoming Alabama senate seat ballot paper.

Moore has denied claims he made sexual advances on several women between the ages of 14 and 18 while he was in his thirties. The explosive revelations were published by the Washington Post, which has interviewed more than 30 people who knew Moore between 1977 and 1982.

On Monday 13 November, another woman came forwards, claiming that Moore forced himself onto her when she was aged 16.

Beverly Young Nelson alleged that while driving her home, he stopped in a dark area, locked the doors and started to grope her. Nelson is the fifth woman to make such claims about Moore.

Republicans are now moving to prevent Moore from standing for election.

Last week, the senate majority leader Mitch McConnell called on Moore to step aside if the allegations are proven to be true.

But he changed his stance on Monday evening (13 November) saying that he now "believed the women" and that Moore should now "step aside".

He was joined by the leader of the campaign arm of Senate Republicans, Senator Cory Gardner. who said if Moore were elected, he should be expelled.

"If he refuses to withdraw and wins, the Senate should vote to expel him, because he does not meet the ethical and moral requirements of the United States Senate," Gardner said.

White House counsellor Kellyanne Conway said: "The President and others in the Republican party have made clear that if the allegations are true this man should step aside.

"But I've gone further than that and I've reflected something the vice president has said as well, which is: Everybody should know that conduct is disqualifying."

Moore, 70, is standing in the 12 December special election in Alabama for a seat in the US senate, and is currently expected to win against his Democratic rival Doug Jones.