Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani girl shot by the Taliban in 2012, has been awarded the 2014 Nobel Peace Prize.

The 17-year-old girl was shot because she was advocating women's rights to receive an education in the country.

The announcement was delivered by Thorbjørn Jagland, Chairman of the Norwegian Nobel Committee.

Yousafzai survived the attempted homicide and was transferred to the UK with her family, where she was able to go to school and has since become a worldwide symbol for the fight against oppression on women and the right to education.

Yousafzai shared the award with Kailash Satyarthi, a child human rights activist based in India.

The Prize was awarded to the two activists "for their struggle against the suppression of children and young people and for the right of all children to education," Jagland said. "Despite her youth, Malala Yousafzay has already fought for several years for the right of girls to education, and has shown by example that children and young people, too, can contribute to improving their own situations.

"Showing great personal courage, Kailash Satyarthi, maintaining Gandhi's tradition, has headed various forms of protests and demonstrations, all peaceful, focusing on the grave exploitation of children for financial gain," he continued.

"The Nobel Committee regards it as an important point for a Hindu and a Muslim, an Indian and a Pakistani, to join in a common struggle for education and against extremism."

More to follow...