New York is bracing itself for blockades, protests, and delays as Donald Trump returns to town.

Trump will return to New York on the afternoon of 4 May for the first time as commander-in-chief, and locals are expecting chaos.

His visit is timed to honour the 74th anniversary of the Battle of the Coral Sea, a major World War II battle in which the US and Australia fought the Japanese.

It is expected that this will be the first in a number of visits to the area in the coming months as his Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida prepares to close for the season

Hundreds of NYPD officers have been deployed to secure his appearance, with many more on standby on surrounding blocks.

At the centre of his Bedminster golf course is the clubhouse, a 1939 red-brick mansion in the Georgian Revival-style where Mr Trump hosted a procession of potential officials for his administration before his inauguration.

Trump will be dropping in on his eponymously named tower on Fifth Avenue in a move which is expected to cause mass tailbacks.

While Fifth and Madison Avenues will remain open, delays are expected with high-speed crash barriers blocking off access to the connecting East 56th Street expect for residents.

Police vehicles, sniffer dogs and bomb teams will also be parked up on standby on the surrounding blocks.

Despite being from New York, Trump has very low support in both the state and city, compared to Hillary Clinton.

In November's election, Trump won just 37% of the state and only 18% of the city.

Trump has also caused a financial headache for the city.

While he lives in the White House, his wife Melania and son Baron live in Trump Tower in Midtown, necessitating an intensive security detail from the NYPD that costs up to $146,000 a day — although the budget deal reached in Washington last weekend will include funding to reimburse the city.

The city's top officials will have no part in Trump's trip to the Big Apple.

A spokesman for Mayor de Blasio, a fierce Trump critic, told the Daily News he "declined an invitation to the event before the President had anything to do with" it.

State Governor Cuomo, meanwhile, demurred when asked if he was invited, or would be attending, any of Trump's events.

"I don't know what his schedule is," Cuomo told reporters following a New York City event. "I don't know whether or not I've been invited to attend anything."