Leanne Wood and Carwyn Jones
Plaid Cymru leader Leanne Wood tied with Welsh Labour chief Carwyn Jones in the first minister election Getty

The Welsh Assembly has experienced high political drama, as the devolved government failed to elect a first minister. The deadlock came after Plaid Cymru leader, Leanne Wood, tied with Welsh Labour chief, Carwyn Jones, (29 to 29) in a vote on Wednesday 11 May.

The decision comes after Labour lost its majority in the Senedd at the 5 May elections, with Plaid Cymru securing 12 constituencies, the Conservatives winning 11 seats, Ukip gaining seven and the Liberal Democrats returning one assembly member (AM).

But the 29-strong Welsh Labour AMs came unstuck after deciding not to make coalition deal, as the Tories and Ukip threw their support behind Wood.

"As is the convention, the biggest party were given an opportunity to reach an agreement on forming a government which could lead Wales with the support of the majority of members in the National Assembly," a Plaid Cymru spokesperson said.

"They took the decision not to pursue that option, and were not prepared to give the process of negotiation any further time.

"As a result, the Plaid Cymru group followed normal parliamentary protocol and nominated Leanne Wood for first minister. Carwyn Jones was informed of this decision yesterday [10 May].

"Since that time, and as far as Plaid Cymru is aware, there have been no formal discussions, agreements or deals pursued between any party."

Kirsty Williams, the sole Liberal Democrat AM, said he she backed Jones in a bid to join a "ragtag" coalition.

A ragtag coalition with UKIP does not represent my politics and is not something I would contemplate.

— Kirsty Williams (@Kirsty_Williams) May 11, 2016

Andrew RT Davies, the leader of the Welsh Conservatives, claimed he sensed an "appetite for a new kind of collaborative Welsh politics" he said. "Labour had no divine right to assume the First Ministership today," continued Davies.

"It is for new AMs to explore, and discuss, the best way forward for the Welsh nation, which has for too long fallen behind the rest of the UK. Certainly, I sense an appetite for a new kind of collaborative Welsh politics, and would welcome further discussions to build on those which led to today's vote."