Examining TeamPoison's recent contribution to Anonymous's OpNigeria campaign, analysts have once again questioned the group's motives and ability.

The hacker group TeamPoison released the data taken in a recent attack on the Nigeria National Assembly, listing the hack as a part of the ongoing OpNigeria campaign on Wednesday via a post on Pastebin.

Following the release, speaking to the International Business Times UK, F-Secure Labs' Security Advisor Sean Sullivan questioned the importance of the data. In his comments Sullivan highlighting the fact that the information taken had no real relevance to the Anonymous led operation's goals or, at times,Nigeria itself.

"How clueless is TeamP0ison? Well, in their supposedly #OpNigeria pastebin message, the third link directs to a small dump belonging to the Wisconsin Chiefs of Police Association (http://wichiefs.org/). Now what does that have to do with Nigeria?" Said Sullivan.

"The other two dumps are very small (about 4MB) and contain little of anything. The 150+ users of the Engineering Materials Development Institute (http://portal.emdi.gov.ng/) all have passwords of '123456.'

"So it's a very poorly configured site, but only four of the users have actually registered their email, and I doubt that they recycle the password. I expect there is very poor security because there is nothing really of value on this site."

Going on, Sullivan reported his belief that the operation was little more than another bid for attention from TeamPoison, which has in the past been accused of riding off Anonymous's coat tails. "TeamP0ison's primary agenda seems to be trying to get famous. They've been trying to be noticed since September (http://www.f-secure.com/weblog/archives/00002242.html)."

Citing the group's involvement in Anonymous Stratfor hack, Sullivan went so far as to suggest that the team has, on numerous occasions, managed to damage the AntiSec message. During the hack TeamPoison is believed to have used the stolen credit card information to donate to a number of charities. The action ended up doing more harm than good, forcing the charities to incur chargeback fees returning the stolen funds.

"Bottomline: TeamP0ison trolls the Internet looking for stuff that they can hack via SQL injections, and then, if they get something, anything, they then try to find some #Op to retrofit their motivations. They "co-Op" with Anonymous as a way of riding Anon's coat tails," concluded Sullivan.