Prime Minister Boris Johnson amped up his campaign trail as his girlfriend Carrie Symonds draped a sari and visited a Hindu temple along with him in London. The couple started their first joint visit of the election. The 31-year-old looked elegant in a red, pink and gold sari.

The couple beamed as they took off their footwear and entered the Neasden temple in London on Saturday. They put up a united front as they laughed and prayed together at the temple, silencing critics, Daily Mail reports.

Home secretary Priti Patel was also in attendance along with the couple. The temple celebrated the 98th birthday of Pramukh Swami.

The British prime minister has not been seen publicly with his girlfriend Carrie Symonds in over a month. The couple was last seen together at the Tory election launch on November 6.

Boris Johnson is amping up his campaigning ahead of Thursday's crunch ballot. Symonds meanwhile has been busy travelling the country along with her adopted dog Dilyn. However, since the election launch, Johnson and Symonds' relationship has come under the campaign spotlight.

The prime minister has always tried to evade questions about his private life. But, he has been grilled by broadcasters on whether he is a "family man". BBC presenter Naga Munchetty also quizzed him about his relationship.

The Lib Dem leader Jo Swinson said this week that Johnson could not protect "our family of nations, because we all know he is not a family man." In spite of the couple's public scrutiny, their relationship has never been a talking point in the election.

Johnson has a 10-point lead on the issue of healthcare, up from six points at the start of the campaign. It only proves that the Tories have been able to capitalise on the fact that health is the most important issue facing families.

Boris Johnson and Carrie Symonds visit temple
Boris Johnson arrived in Manchester for the Conservative party conference with his partner Carrie Symonds. Photo: AFP / Oli SCARFF

In a related development, Johnson will announce on Sunday his new immigration policy, The Telegraph reports. As per the policy, there will be restrictions on low-skilled migrants on moving to Britain, post Brexit unless there is a "specific shortage" of staff in their sector.