Dietitians have blasted Gwyneth Paltrow's controversial lifestyle brand Goop after it offered readers tips on how to achieve their "leanest liveable weight".

In the piece entitled: "Busting Diet Myths," it explained:"Your 'leanest liveable weight' is the weight at the low end of your 'set range.' Your set range is a genetically determined range of weight that your body generally keeps you in, despite your efforts to escape it."

"The weight at which you will not die? That's a very fine (and dangerous) line," commented one Twitter user reacting to the advice offered in the feature article.

IBTimes UK has contacted Goop for a comment on the article and is awaiting a response.

"It's a reflection of the society we live in," Aisling Pigott, a spokesperson for the British Dietetic Association (BDA) told IBTimes UK. "We value and idolise leanness, glorify it in fact. Aiming to keep your weight as low as possible feeds into these ideals and unfortunately is not helpful when our focus should be on health and well-being."

Asked if it could be dangerous for the average person to try to calculate their leanest liveable weight, BDA spokesperson Priya Tew told IBTimes UK: "Absolutely. Focusing too much on weight, shape and what you eat can become obsessive for some people. Many develop an eating disorder after a restrictive diet."

"Anything that glorifies leanness and demonises weight gain can contribute to disordered eating and thoughts, however eating disorders are much more complex than just diet and body image alone," said Pigott.

She added that being happy with your body at every size was more important than being lean; as is focusing on food as the body's fuel, and aiming for "enough but not too much". She warned against making changes for health reasons and not body image.

"Research shows dietary changes for health are more maintainable than body image," she said.

"The focus needs to move away from weight and move towards health," added Tew. "Looking at making changes to your lifestyle that improve your health such as stopping smoking, being active daily, eating more fruit and vegetables, eating more fibre.

"If you did all of these you would be looking after your body. Your weight is not the most important factor as you can be lean and unhealthy.

"Our body is wonderful. It does amazing things every single day and we should be proud of it," added Pigott.