Manchester United coach Phil Neville has said the sacking of David Moyes as manager was one of the lowest points in his football career.

Neville had been a loyal lieutenant to Moyes during his time at Everton and was brought into the United fold by the Scotsman.

But following crushing defeats to rivals Manchester City, Liverpool and Everton and with United sat in a lowly seventh position, Moyes was shown the Old Trafford exit door.

And Neville believes everyone at the club should shoulder blame for United's disastrous season, which has seen them take the least number of points at home for 40 years and finish in their lowest position since the Premier League's inception in 1992.

"At a club that should be challenging for the title, to finish sixth or seventh is obviously not good enough. And to see a man who, for the last eight years, has put so much faith and confidence in me, giving me the platform either to play or coach, lose his job was probably one of the toughest days I've had in football," he told The Mirror.

"Everyone connected to the club will take responsibility because we win together and lose together. It was really disappointing when David lost his job because I class him as a friend as well as a manager.

As a player, I had never experienced anything like that with a manager before in my career - maybe once with England, when Kevin Keegan lost his job. Ferguson and Moyes have been the bedrock of my professional life, so to see him [Moyes] lose his job, it took a while to sink in."

The former United and Everton defender retained his job at United under interim manager Ryan Giggs after he was installed last month.

But the 37-year-old has not yet had any assurances he will survive a backroom clearout manager-in-waiting Louis Van Gaal might have in mind.

He added: "The bigger picture is, I don't know what's around the corner for me in terms of my own personal job - that's up to other people - but the season as a whole has just not been good enough for Manchester United."