Apple App Store apps vulnerable to Freak
Pricing on Apple's UK App Store is set to increase by around 25%. Apple

Apple has confirmed today (17 January) that the cost of apps and in-app purchases on the UK App Store will increase by around 25%. The move follows negative fluctuations in the value of the pound (GBP) attributed to 2016's historic Brexit vote.

While there is no specific date for the imminent price hike, Apple has notified developers that higher prices will appear on the iOS and Mac App Stores within the next seven days.

As an example of how the increase will impact the current range of apps available across Apple's platforms, apps which cost $0.99 in the US will now also cost 99p, up from 79p. Similarly, unlocking the full game in the recently released Super Mario Run will see its in-app purchase jump from £7.99 to £9.99.

"When foreign exchange rates or taxation changes, we sometimes need to update prices on the App Store," Apple explained in an email obtained by 9to5Mac, before later releasing a statement to further explain the changes.

"Price tiers on the App Store are set internationally on the basis of several factors, including currency exchange rates, business practices, taxes and the cost of doing business. These factors vary from region to region and over time," read the statement.

While not specified by Apple, the decision is expected to extend to the Cupertino giant's other online platforms in the near future, with movies, books and music the next potential target for a price increase on the iTunes Store.

This is not the first time Apple has hit UK customers' wallets following Britain's vote to leave the EU. Both the iPhone 7 and Mac range were hit with significant price hikes in late 2016, with the cheapest iMac up from £899 to £1,049 on the Apple's online store.

Other tech manufacturers such as OnePlus and HTC have also cited Brexit as the reasoning behind notable price increases, while motorists have been warned that imported cars could see up to £1,500 added to their cost price should the UK leave the single market.