David Cameron has targeted older UK voters in a last-ditch plea outside Number 10, with just two days to go before the EU referendum on 23 June. The prime minister, who is campaigning for a Remain vote at the historic ballot, urged older people to think of their children's future when they go to the polls on Thursday.

"It will be future generations – the apprentices and the graduates starting out in life, the children learning in our schools, those yet to be born – who will be hit hardest," Cameron declared.

"It's for that reason I want to speak very directly to those of my generation, and older. I know Europe isn't perfect. Believe me, I understand and I see those frustrations. I feel them myself.

"That's why we negotiated and enhanced our special status. Out of the Euro. Keeping our borders. Not involved in ever-closer union. We have the best of both worlds.

He added: "So as you take this decision – whether to remain or leave – do think about the hopes and dreams of your children and grandchildren. They know their chances to work, to travel, to build the sort of open and successful society they want to live in, rests on this outcome."

The Conservative leader also warned that the result of the referendum would be irreversible.
"We will leave Europe – for good," Cameron said. "And the next generation will have to live with the consequences far longer than the rest of us."

The appeal comes as the latest opinion polls predict that the referendum result will be close. A telephone survey from Survation, of more than 1,000 people on 20 June, put Remain on 45% and Leave on 44%. A separate online poll from YouGov, of more than 1,600 people between 18 and 19 June, put Leave on 44% and Remain on 42%.

Meanwhile, Vote Leave campaigner Michael Gove has urged the electorate to back a Brexit and jump from the EU's "sinking ship". The justice secretary told CNBC: "By voting to leave we can not only take back control of hundreds of millions of pounds that we send to the EU, we will also be detaching ourselves from the sinking ship that is the EU economy."

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