Neil Harbisson, the UK-based self-declared "cyborg artist" who got an antenna implanted into his head, has said humans will embrace technology to extend their personality.

Speaking at the World Government Summit in Dubai, Harbisson stressed on the need of integration between man and machine and said governments should slowly accept people who prefer to design themselves by installing cybernetic body parts, in a way similar to him.

"As species, we have been modifying the planet for thousands of years to adapt," the cyborg artist told Khaleej Times. "Why don't we redesign ourselves instead? It will be better for our planet, other species and ourselves".

He said technology-rigged capabilities like night-vision or body temperature regulation could eliminate the need for electronic appliances and tackle the pressing problem of climate change and natural resource depletion.

Harbisson suffered from achromatopsia, a rare form of colour blindness that left him in a world of grayscale. He couldn't see any colour beyond white and black but the hi-tech skull implant restored his ability to perceive colours.

Precisely, the technology reads colour frequencies and converts them into vibrations which his brain has learned to understand. He has been using the tech since 2004 and sees it as a part of his body, reported DailyMail.

And not just Earthly colours, Harbisson's tech also helps him feel cosmic imagery. "I call this becoming an astronaut," he said while noting that web connectivity helps him perceive colours from any part of the world and even links him to satellites to explore space objects.

"People who have permission can send colours to my head any time of the day. If they sent me the colour yellow when I'm sleeping, my dream turns yellow, or a lion shows up."

Harbisson runs Cyborg Foundation, an international organisation that defends cyborg rights and helps people who want to install cybernetic implants. Plus, he also plans to install a new implant between his skin and skull for the sense of time.