The United States of America has welcomed the apparent pause in war between Turkish forces and Kurdish militia fighters in northern Syria on Tuesday (30 August). It has also urged them to focus their efforts on fighting Islamic State (Isis) militants.

"The United States welcomes the overnight calm between the Turkish military and other counter-ISIL forces in Syria," White House spokesman Josh Earnest was quoted as saying by Reuters.

Col John Thomas of US Central Command, told BBC that it was a loose agreement for at least the next couple of days and they were hoping that would solidify.

However, US state department spokesman John Kirby said that he would not be able to confirm whether a truce was in place, but said the conflicts had stopped "and that's the outcome that we want".

On 24 August, Turkish forces and sections of the rebel Free Syrian Army (FSA) forced Isis out of the Syrian city of Jarablus.

The move by Turkey, a NATO ally, has left Washington alarmed as Ankara's operation not only aims to push back IS (Daesh) but also to prevent Kurdish fighters from acquiring more areas along the Turkish border.

Turkey fears the advancement of Kurdish fighters might establish a Kurdish enclave along Syria's northern border, which could propel the Kurdish insurgency on Turkish soil.

Turkey has demanded Kurdish militia to withdraw their power from east across the Euphrates river and said that the ceasefire is only a "pause" and military operations would soon resume.

The Turkish foreign ministry also said that it was waiting for Kurdish forces to "fulfill a promise" and leave east of the Euphrates "as soon as possible".

Meanwhile, Turkish presidential spokesman Ibrahim Kalin blamed Kurdish-led forces for "shamelessly using the war in Syria to create a de-facto terrorist state in Syria", and added, "Turkey will not allow that".