Former Arsenal defender Sol Campbell has cautioned England fans not to travel to Euro 2012 because of fears over violence in Poland and Ukraine.

Campbell told BBC's Panorama that fans should refrain from travelling to this summer's tournament because of the threat posed by violence and racism in the two countries.

The ex-England captain, who won 73 caps for his country, has questioned UEFA's decision to choose the countries to host the event in the first place.

"Stay at home, watch it on TV. Don't even risk it... because you could end up coming back in a coffin," Campbell is quoted by the BBC.

"I think that they were wrong, because what they should say is that 'if you want this tournament, you sort your problems out. Until we see a massive improvement... you do not deserve these prestigious tournaments in your country."

"UEFA Euro 2012 brings the spotlight on the host countries and clearly creates an opportunity to address and confront such societal issues.

"UEFA's 'zero tolerance' approach to racism is still valid both on and off the pitch and ultimately the referee has the power to stop or abandon a match should racist incidents occur."

Panorama spent a month filming at club matches in both home nations and recorded images of "Nazi salutes from the terraces, black players being taunted with monkey chants, rampant anti-Semitism and a vicious assault on a group of Asian students"

The parents of two England players, Theo Walcott and Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain, have already expressed concern and will reportedly not travel to the tournament for fear of racist attacks.

Oxlade-Chamberlain's father, Mark Chamberlain, told Sky Sports News: "There have been reports of racist taunts and threats so it's just prudent for myself to keep away from it."

A UEFA spokesman said: "UEFA Euro 2012 brings the spotlight on the host countries and clearly creates an opportunity to address and confront such societal issues.

"UEFA's 'zero tolerance' approach to racism is still valid both on and off the pitch and ultimately the referee has the power to stop of abandon a match should racist incidents occur."

England centre-back Joleon Lescott has admitted his disappointment that the family of Oxlade-Chamberlain does not feel it is safe to watch the teenager at Euro 2012.

"It's a shame for some members of the squad that their families feel they can't go and obviously it's a situation that needs to be addressed," said the Manchester City defender.

"But I think we always will be (talking about it). You can't get rid of it from people's minds. It is a touchy subject for some people. But if you address it pretty early I don't think it will be a problem.

"On the whole, our country deals with it pretty well. It is not as bad in England as it is in other countries.

"It was quite alarming to see the reports about the situation out there, but even before the reports, my family weren't going anyway. It's not the same as with Theo's and Alex's family."