A girl scout has been placed under police protection after a photo of her confronting neo-Nazis at a rally in the Czech Republic went viral.

Lucie Myslikova, 16, was among about 300 protesters who gathered to demonstrate against the far-right group Workers' Party of Social Justice in the city of Brno on 1 May.

A photo of the teenager, taken by Vladimír Čičmanec, was soon seen across the world, with the picture drawing similarities to images such as Saffiyah Khan smiling as she faced off with a member of the English Defence League (EDL) in Birmingham.

The Czech Interior Ministry has now said that police are taking steps "to ensure the security" of the girl after threats were made against her on Facebook. No further details on the type of threats were given by the ministry.

Explaining her reason for attending the protests against the far-right group, Myslikova told the Associated Press: "I think it's important. I think young people should comment on public issues, to express their views. They will live in the future and they should create it as they wish."

The 16-year-old added that it is a "strange feeling" that a picture of her has been seen by potentially millions across the world. She added: "It's weird that someone happened to take a picture of me and at the same time people can't see how many people were around who were doing the same as me. I wasn't there alone."

Discussing taking the picture in Brno, Čičmanec previously told IB Times UK: "The photo was taken after a friend of mine made me aware of the exchange taking place. It was heated, the neo-Nazi was clearly angry with her, but she stood her ground. I turned around, quickly paced the few metres I was away from them, started shooting and suddenly the bubbles started arriving.

"I was thinking about the Saffiyah Khan photo when I started shooting, the situation looked similar, and the bubbles were just a sweet coincidence. I thought 'this will be a nice photo', but in the sense 'when my friends see it on Facebook, they'll probably like it'.

"I initially shared it with limited privacy not thinking much about it. And then people wanted me to make it public and it exploded."