SpaceX aborted the launch of a Falcon 9 rocket carrying a nearly 15,000 lb (6804 kg) communications satellite just 10 seconds before liftoff on Sunday (2 July) due to an apparent technical glitch. Officials said the next launch opportunity is scheduled for Monday at 7:37PM EST.

Elon Musk's space company attempted to launch its third Falcon 9 rocket in nine days following its historic "doubleheader weekend" last week that saw the launch of a Bulgarian communications satellite from the Kennedy Space Center on Friday. The company delivered 10 Iridium NEXT satellites to orbit from the Vandenberg Air Force Base in California on Sunday.

As SpaceX was counting down to a scheduled 7:36PM liftoff on Sunday, the company halted at the T-minus 10-second mark with engineers reporting an "out-of-limits" reading in the rocket's guidance and navigation system.

"This is a computer abort that happened at T-minus 10 seconds where we're looking at the status of the guidance system and the flight hardware that supports it," John Insprucker, Falcon 9 principal integration engineer, said during SpaceX's launch webcast.

"It appears that something was out of limits. The computer stopped the countdown before we got into the engine-ignition sequence."

SpaceX will attempt to launch Intelsat 35e again on Monday - a powerful commercial communications satellite that delivers high performance services in C- and Ku-bands.

The Boeing-built Intelsat 35e, one of the heaviest satellites delivered by SpaceX, will deliver high-performance services in the Caribbean, as well as services for mobile and government applications in the Caribbean, the African continent and trans-Europe to Africa.

Unlike its recent launches, SpaceX will not attempt to recover the Falcon 9's rocket booster for reuse this time around. Due to the weight of its payload and the delivery of the satellite into geostationary orbit - about 23,000 miles above Earth, the rocket will not have enough fuel leftover to attempt a controlled landing.

Liftoff for the Intelsat 35e mission is scheduled for 7:37PM EST (12:37AM BST on 4 July) with a 58-minute launch window. The satellite will be deployed approximately 32 minutes after launch. The launch will be streamed live on SpaceX's hosted webcast on YouTube.