Britney Spears' younger sister, Jamie Lynn, said she only wants the singer to be happy and will support whatever step she takes to end her 13-year-long conservatorship under their father.

The 30-year-old "Zoey 101" star said she can now comment publicly about the situation now that her sister testified about it in court. She admitted that she only wants what is best for the singer and supports her in whatever decision she makes to be happy.

"Since the day I was born, I've only loved, adored, and supported my sister. I'm so proud of her for using her voice," Jamie Lynn said in a video posted on Instagram Stories on Monday.

"I'm so proud of her for requesting new counsel like I told her to do many years ago. Not in a big public platform but just in a personal conversation between two sisters. So very proud that she's taken that step," she added.

The "Sweet Magnolias" actress also commented on Britney's claims during the court hearing that her conservatorship prevented her from having any more children. She said they forced her to use an IUD and refused to have it removed by a doctor.

"I don't care if she wants to run away to a rain forest and have a zillion babies in the middle of nowhere, or if she wants to come back and dominate the world the way she has so many times before because I have nothing to gain or lose either way," she continued as she added, "this situation does not affect me either way because I am only her sister who's only concerned about her happiness."

"My sister knows that I love and support her. I'm not my family, I'm my own person, I'm speaking for myself," she said in reference to what Britney told the court that she would like to sue her own family for their participation in the conservatorship.

In closing, Jamie Lynn said she would support her sister "ending the conservatorship or flying to Mars or whatever she wants to do to be happy." She also asked everyone to "keep praying" for Britney.

Jamie Lynn Spears
Britney Spears' younger sister Jamie Lynn speaks up in defense of singer after conservatorship hearing. Jamie Gilliam/Reuters