The Charity Commission has opened an investigation into the Stockwell Green mosque accused of distributing leaflets calling for followers of the Ahmadi Muslim sect to be killed.

In April, IBTimes UK exposed the distribution of hate speech leaflets in London branding the persecuted Ahmadi Muslims "worse than apostates" and calling for them to be executed.

The leaflets carried the address of the mosque, also known as Aalami Majlise Tahaffuze Khatme Nubuwwat, and a BBC investigation found copies of the leaflets on the premises of the registered charity.

The mosque has denied involvement in the distribution of the leaflets, and claims they may have been left on its premises maliciously.

In a statement, the charity watchdog said the mosque was "identified for a monitoring visit" following allegations it was "distributing literature from its premises promoting hatred towards the Ahmadi community".

"The visit was carried out in May 2016 with a subsequent visit in July 2016," said the statement.

"The visits identified serious regulatory concerns regarding how the charity is being managed including indications of poor governance, risks to charity property due to poor financial management and the trustees carrying out activities outside of the charity's stated objects."

The Khatme Nubuwwat, or 'finality of the Prophet', movement has instigated violent persecution of the Ahmadi Muslim sect in Pakistan, whom it accuses of not worshipping Muhammad as the final Prophet.

In April, the Muslim Council of Britain ordered the temporary suspension of the mosque "because of the seriousness and the gravity of the allegations made about the organisation".

In an interim report, an independent panel found "no independent evidence that these leaflets, if indeed were on the premises of Aalami Majlise Tahaffuze Khatme Nubuwwat Stockwell Mosque, were condoned or sanctioned by the Mosque."

In February, Ahmadi shopkeeper Asad Shah was murdered in Glasgow by Muslim extremist Tanveer Ahmed who claimed Shah had "disrespected Islam".