Brazil boss Luis Felipe Scolari would happily return to Chelsea despite being sacked as manager after seven months in charge in 2009.

The 65 year old took charge of just 36 games, winning 20, before becoming the fourth manager dismissed by owner Roman Abramovich.

Scolari has return to lead the Brazil national team into a World Cup on home soil with the aim of repeating the heroics of 2002 but his spell in English football is never far from his memory.

"I was upset by the way my departure from Chelsea happened," Scolari told The Guardian.

"I was being honest with the club in everything I did. We were doing reasonably well on the pitch. I wish my work at Chelsea could have lasted longer, especially because I was prepared to spend at least two or three seasons in London and experience the Premier League and Champions League football."

"A few players did not agree with the decisions I had to make for the good of the team. I heard them complaining and saying: 'I don't play in this or that position.' Never mind the fact that one of the players I had put into the first team was actually one of the league top scorers at that point."

"If I had to return, I would do it," he added. "Chelsea are an spectacular club and I still want them to do well. The supporters are amazing and even though things didn't work out I still remember how nice the fans were to me."

"I can't complain too much. What happened in England was a disappointment but my life changed for the better and I will have the honour of managing Brazil in our home World Cup. That is an improvement in my book."

Scolari knocked England out of major competitions on three separate occasions, once with Brazil in the 2002 World Cup after Ronaldinho's winning free-kick, and twice with Portugal in the European Championship in 2004 and the 2006 World Cup both via a penalty-shoot out.

Having beaten Spain in the summer's Confederations Cup final, Brazil are naturally among the favourites to win the World Cup next summer a decade on from when Scolari achieved the feat in Japan and Korea.