Galaxy Note10: Official Introduction Samsung

Samsung appears to have released all of its flagship devices for 2019, but it seems that the next-generation models are almost finished as well. Industry analysts believe that what is coming up soon is the Galaxy S11 and its other variants. In recent weeks, rumours have been circulating about the final retail design of each version. Just recently, a reliable insider has reportedly uncovered renders of these devices. Earlier this week, images purported to be the S11 an S11e surfaced online. Now, it looks as if the S11+ will carry a main camera module with an odd arrangement.

For a while now, Samsung has been copying Apple's strategy of releasing multiple versions of their premium models. This does not seem to have changed as sources claim the impending S-series launch will add the S11, S11e, and S11+ to the roster. Most of the details regarding these new handsets are still unavailable, but the renders give consumers an idea of how the smartphones look like.

All three apparently share a similar form factor up front with the hole-punch camera on the top middle of the display. Additionally, Samsung has now done away with the waterfall display technology, which gives each version a screen with a more subtle curve on the edges. Now that the similarities are out of the way, it is time to look at each of the differences.

The S11e's main camera module houses three sensors and an LED flash, while the S11 sports a five-camera setup. The S11+ likewise comes with a five-camera module but with a wider gap between the lenses. The renders show that the sensors are scattered around almost randomly. Sources speculate that the spaces might be intentional and reserved for other components. On the other hand, these renders might not be a hundred per cent accurate as well, as implied by Android Authority.

Other key takeaways from the images suggest that the Bixby button might be finally getting the axe. Samsung's virtual assistant is evidently lagging behind its rivals, which is enough for the manufacturer to completely stop supporting the platform. Finally, it appears that the 3.5 mm headphone jack will not be making a return to the Galaxy S11+ and its other variants as well.

Samsung plans to outsource production to China
Samsung leads the global smartphone market with a 23 percent share AFP / Jung Yeon-je