Kate Middleton has opened up about feeling 'isolated' when her first child was born.

The Duchess of Cambridge reveals she felt "isolated" and "cut off" as a first-time mother after she gave birth to Prince George in 2016, as she didn't have her family around and husband Prince William was often away covering night shifts in the royal Air Force.

The mother-of-three, who stayed in Wales with William after the birth of Prince George, came back to the country on Wednesday during her 24-hour tour of the United Kingdom on behalf of kids. Speaking to workers at a children and parents centre in Cardiff, Kate said: "It's nice to be back in Wales. I was chatting to some of the mums. It was the first year and I'd just had George — William was still working with search and rescue — and we came up here and I had a tiny, tiny baby in the middle of Anglesey."

"It was so isolated, so cut off," the 38-year-old said at the innovative Ely and Careau Children's Centre in an economically challenged area of the Welsh capital, adding, "I didn't have any family around, and he was doing night shifts. So...if only I had had a centre like this."

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In Cardiff The Duchess of Cambridge joined a baby sensory class at the Ely and Caerau Children’s Centre to hear about the support that parents and staff receive, and to talk about the #5BigQuestions on the Under 5s Survey. The launch of the survey follows eight years of work by The Duchess, in which she has explored how experiences in early childhood often lie at the root of the hardest social challenges the country faces today. What we experience in the earliest years – from in the womb to the age of five – is instrumental in shaping our future lives. It takes just 5 minutes to have your say in the biggest ever conversation on early childhood – click the link in our bio to answer the #5BigQuestions on the Under 5s.

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"I see amazing work you're doing here in so many areas. It's just bringing it to light. The critical work you're doing has a massive social — and economic — impact later down the years," the duchess said about the centre where parents can get support as well as enroll their kids into the kindergarten.

Royal Tour of Canada
The Duchess of Cambridge plays with her children, while Prince William blows up balloons Chris Jackson/ Getty Images

The visit was a part of Kate's fact-finding tour to promote her 5 Big Questions survey, under her ongoing initiative to support the early development of children. The questions include topics such as nature vs. nurture, health and happiness, and aim to help guide what can be done to help vulnerable children and families for generations to come, reports People.

"The launch of the survey follows eight years of work by The Duchess, in which she has explored how experiences in early childhood often lie at the root of the hardest social challenges the country faces today," read a statement by Kensington Palace.