Great Britain have climbed into second in the medals table after winning a historic five golds on day nine at Rio 2016, the day Usain Bolt honed his reputation as the fastest man on the planet.

Bolt, 29, stormed to a third gold medal in the 100m final on a historic night for the Jamaican, who is also hoping to defend his 200m and 4x100m titles in Brazil.

He becomes the first athlete to win three consecutive gold medals in the same event after thundering across the finishing line with a time of 9.81 seconds.

Justin Gatlin took the silver medal after finishing with a time of 9.89 seconds, with Canada's Neil DeGrasse claiming the bronze with a time of 9.91 seconds.

Elsewhere, Andy Murray won his second Olympic gold medal, repeating his success of London 2012 after an enthralling battle with Juan Martin Del Potro of Argentina.

Usain Bolt
The moment Bolt made history. Getty

It was Great Britain's fifth medal won on Sunday (14 August) with Max Whitlock also making history by becoming the first Briton to win a medal in a gymnastics event. The 23-year-old clinched gold in the men's floor exercise and just over an hour later, he was back out to win a second gold in the pommel horse event, with Team GB teammate Louis Smith winning silver.

Prior to that, Justin Rose won golf's first gold medal since 1904, after a thrilling duel with Sweden's Henrik Stenson. Rose and the 2016 Open champion arrived on the final hole tied at 15 under par. After watching Stenson hit an agonising bogey, Rose held his nerve to sink his putt and make a birdie to seal victory by two shots.

Amid all that, Jason Kenny won his fifth gold medal in an all-British final in the men's individual cycling sprint, seeing off teammate Callum Skinner to move him level with Sir Bradley Wiggins.

Jason Kenny and Callum Skinner
Kenny beats teammate Skinner to claim individual gold. Getty

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Prior to Bolt's mesmerising run, South Africa's Wayde van Niekerk provided a telling glimpse into the future of athletics when he broke Michael Johnson's 17-year-old record in the 400m final. The 24-year-old soared past Grenada's Kirani James and American LaShawn Merritt to finish with a staggering time of 43.03 seconds, 0.15 seconds quicker than the time Johnson hit in Seville in 1999.

There was heartbreak for Great Britain's Christine Ohuruogu, however, after the 32-year-old failed to qualify for the final of the women's 400m. The 2008 gold medallist finished in a disappointing fifth place and strongly hinted after her race she is now ready to retire.

"I think it's one minute to midnight and this girl is about to turn into a pumpkin," she told BBC Sport.

"I think it's coming to an end, training is getting harder. I have been stuck in one gear all season. I am disappointed but I am happy I made it this far. These girls are fit and I wasn't able to compete with them."

Joshua Buatsi
Buatsi to return to London with at least a bronze. Getty

Hope is growing for Great Britain's boxing team, however. with Joshua Buatsi now guaranteed a medal in the 81kg light heavyweight category after a comprehensive victory over Algeria's Abdelhafid Benchabla. The 23-year-old Londoner booked his place in the semi-final after sealing a clean sweep of all three judges' cards, having forced two standing counts from the referee after rocking his opponent with a series of powerful rights.

Savannah Marshall meanwhile put her first round exit at London 2012 well and truly behind her with victory over Sweden's Anna Laurell, booking her place in women's middleweight quarter-finals in Rio.

Pat McCormack was unable to join them, however, after the talented light-welterweight lost out in his last 16 contest. The 21-year-old was handed possibly the most difficult fight on offer against Cuba's Yasnier Toledo, losing out narrowly on a split decision but left with his growing reputation significantly enhanced.