A 17-year-old in the United States has allegedly shot and killed a man after being sold common kitchen spices instead of marijuana.

Seth Carreras faced court on Friday (5 January) to decide whether he would be transferred to the adult prison and what his bail terms would be. He has been charged with first-degree murder and will be tried as an adult. The judge, David Connors, ruled he would be moved. Carreras' lawyer, Julie George, did not contest or speak on the matter.

The victim was 19-year-old Hunter Woodson, who was an acquaintance of Carreras. The shooting allegedly took place in Woodson's home on 21 November.

According to the Salt Lake Tribune, Carreras had driven to Woodsen's home to buy marijuana for $121 USD. Woodsen had reportedly told Carreras he did not have enough for the sale but that he would figure something out. Upon arriving, Carreras was met by Woodson's girlfriend, Kayla Gibson, to collect the money.

Woodson, meanwhile, was in his kitchen filling a small pink bag with salt, pepper and paprika. Shortly after the deal was complete, Carreras realised he had been duped. He then allegedly marched into Woodson's home and confronted him with a gun.

Gibson, 17, was told to hide behind the door. Woodson confronted Carreras and, according to Gibson, said something similar to "what are you going to do, shoot me?"

The girlfriend told police she heard several shots and witnessed Carreras going through Woodson's pockets for money. She called the police and Carreras was arrested 20 minutes later at his home in Leyton, Utah.

Woodson's uncle, Travis Woodson, revealed his thoughts as Carreras walked into the court room. "I feel like he had zero remorse for what he did," Travis told the Salt Lake Tribune. "He was proud of what he did. He was acting like he was proud of it."

Despite their pleasure with the judge's verdict – that Carreras be sent to an adult prison and not be given bail – Travis said nothing could ultimately make the situation right. "None of this is going to bring Hunter back," he said. "We don't get to go into the courthouse and visit Hunter. We get to go to a grave site and visit grass."