The world of fitness is not just dominated by model-like creatures, prancing around with rock-hard abs and leading sports brand Nike have finally tuned into this reality with their latest sports bra campaign – leaving the general public very impressed.

Their latest image range promoting the Pro Bra features plus-size models Paloma Elsesser and yoga instructor Claire Fountain posing in the new sports range in the Nike Women's latest Instagram posts – accompanied with tips on how to correctly select and wear a sports bra.

The most refreshing thing about the new campaign is that the images are about the bra, not the model. There is no mention of plus-size or all-sizes, Nike have simply focused on women working out. This has proved extremely successful, judging by the reactions on the images. With over 72k likes on the image of Paloma Elsesser stretching out and over 62k on Claire Fountain's yoga image – it marks a shift in athletic advertising, one that people have clearly been waiting to see from the brand.

Welcome to Sports Bra 101 🤓 ⠀ Fact (1 of 4): Most women wear a band too big and cup too small. Raise your hands above your head. If the band moves up, you may need to size down. Learn more through the link in our profile. ⠀ #nike #nikeprobra #sportsbra

A photo posted by NikeWomen (@nikewomen) on

Instagram user @r0ck_bottom commented "You are great with showing body types of natural woman. Love it! <3" and @stefaniapomponi wrote "Yes! Thank you for showing a real, strong woman's body!"

Hold tight ✋ ⠀ Fact (3 of 4): Sports bras are designed to take on more impact than regular bras – this is why the band of your sports bras should fit slightly tighter than your everyday bra. Learn more through the link in our profile. ⠀ #nike #nikeprobra #sportsbra

A photo posted by NikeWomen (@nikewomen) on

There were also many calls for the brand to extend their size range all over. The new Pro collections go from a size 30A to a 40E, with the Pro Rival design featured in the adverts retailing at £45. However, the wider size range does not extend across all Nike's women's lines and if the brand is to continue a move in the right direction towards representing all body types then the rest of their designs will have to follow suit.

Nike are no stranger to using powerful role models in their campaigns, with the likes of Serena Williams and US gymnast Simone Biles, but this is the first time that their models have represented the stronger or larger woman and it can only be a good thing.