A 22-year-old man has been arrested for having sexual intercourse with a dog carcass after strangling the pregnant canine in the southern Indian city of Hyderabad, Telangana. The police suspect the perpetrator could have been under the influence of drugs when the incident took place.

The suspect was named by local police as Aslam Khan (aka Subash Singh). Local media reports that he was originally from Nepal, and had recently moved from New Delhi for work. The incident took place in the Shastripuram neighbourhood where the intoxicated youth was caught red-handed by the local residents.

Khan is alleged to have strangled the animal with a rope before taking its body to a nearby secluded area to perform the grisly act. He reportedly trespassed into a house to steal the dog. The two sons of the dog's owner claim to have found the culprit and the body in the isolated location.

"We know that he was intoxicated. He could have been on drugs also – we are yet to confirm it. He has been arrested," a police officer told News Minute.

While the accused has been taken for medical examination, veterinary doctors are conducting a post-mortem to the animal. Authorities ruled out that Khan was mentally unstable.

The suspect has been charged under the 377 section of the Indian penal code which criminalises "unnatural sex", and the animal cruelty act of 429. Section 377 states: "Whoever voluntarily has carnal intercourse against the order of nature with any man, woman or animal, shall be punished with imprisonment for life, or with imprisonment of either description for a term which may extend to ten years, and shall also be liable to fine."

Animal rights activists are also concerned about the rise of violence against animals in India. In July, two medical students threw a dog from the roof of a two storey building and filmed its fall, later uploading the video to social media.

Activist NG Jayasimha said: "These incidents expose the violent nature of human beings and it's high time we arrest such actions. Such perpetrators must be brought to book so we can set precedence for future wrong-doers."