Jimbo, a 1,500 pound Kodiak bear lives at the non-profit Orphaned Wildlife Centre, a haven for injured or unwanted animals in Otisville, upstate New York.

Orphaned Wildlife Center
Jim Kowalczik plays with Jimbo, a 1500-pound Kodiak bear, at the Orphaned Wildlife Center Mike Groll/ AP

Run by Jim and Susan Kowalczik, the Orphaned Wildlife Centre currently has 11 bears living there, most of whom have been born in captivity. Jimbo, who came from the West Coast game farm after injuring his leg, has been in their care for almost 23 years. Frankie, a black bear, was also born in the wild but was brought to the enclosure after being hit by a car.

Orphaned Wildlife Center
Jim Kowalczik plays with Jimbo, a 1500-pound Kodiak bear, at the Orphaned Wildlife Center Mike Groll/ AP

The couple have been rehabilitating squirrels, ducks, deer, mink and other animals together since the early 1990s. The main goal is to release animals, but the bears here cannot be released because of injuries or because they are too accustomed to captivity. Jim and Susan funded the venture out of their own pockets, and are now able to take donations –they still run the centre by themselves, with the help of director Kerry Clair, who handles administrative duties.

Orphaned Wildlife Center
Jim Kowalczik plays with Jimbo, a 1500-pound Kodiak bear, at the Orphaned Wildlife Center Mike Groll/ AP

During an interview with the Associated Press, Jim Kowalczik lies on the ground as Jimbo rests a heavy paw on his waist. Feeding Jimbo a marshmallow, Jim laughs as the bear's tongue slobbers on his ear. "He'll play with you all day if you have the time," he said, adding that it's fortunate the bear doesn't throw his weight around casually. "If he lays on you, you've got a problem." The videos, which the couple have posted on social media, help with the exposure. "They're content, they're happy. If they weren't," Kowalczik pauses as Jimbo licks him, "you would know it."

Orphaned Wildlife Center
Jim Kowalczik plays with Jimbo, a 1500-pound Kodiak bear, at the Orphaned Wildlife Center Mike Groll/ AP

A question we get a LOT this time of year, is "Do the bears still hibernate (in captivity)?".The answer is "kind of". The bears slow down a GREAT deal. They eat very little. They sleep most of the day. But they don't truly go into a hibernation. If you scroll back to last year you'll see lots of videos of our bears playing in the snow. They love to play in the snow!In recent years there has also been a LOT of debate among scientists as to if bears actually hibernate or not. Many say that what bears do is go into a torpor state and NOT a true hibernation.

Posted by Orphaned Wildlife Center on Tuesday, October 11, 2016

Everyone loves when papa bear starts handing out treats!

Posted by Orphaned Wildlife Center on Wednesday, October 12, 2016