News about the Royals touring to India has been the talk of the entire weekend and it looks like someone very close to home, has some advice for the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge on what to expect from their trip to India. Patrick Jephson, who was the first and only private secretary to The Princess of Wales Diana for six years, wrote in an article from the Telegraph that Prince William and Kate Middleton had a lot more privileges than what Princess Diana and Prince Charles had went through.

Other than preparing for the basics such as remembering your socks, underwear, earrings and making sure you get enough sleep for your trip, according to Jephson, Princess Diana went through more than just what looked like a tour with the prince and attending Bollywood-inspired charity galas enjoying a great marriage while experiencing a new culture. Prince William's parents may have put on a smile for the nation, however both Diana and Charles knew that their relationship was deeply flawed through rushing into marriage.

Prince William's mother created a media firestorm during her visit to India when she posed alone for a photograph in front of the Taj Mahal, the ivory-white marble mausoleum known as a monument to love because it was built by a Mughal emperor to entomb his beloved wife. The newspapers suggested that it was a hidden message about the end of her marriage to Prince Charles.

According to Patrick, both Prince Williams and Kate Middleton are lucky enough to have had a choice in their marriage. Even though Princess Diana and Pince Charles were separated, the prince's team continued to organise joint programmes, where Jephson says his "heart went out to her". The royal couple are both also expected to visit the Taj Mahal, as well as attending a memorial at the Taj Palace Hotel to commemorate the victims of the 2008 Mumbai attack.

Jephson wrote to Will and Kate some heartfelt advice after what he had experienced with Prince William's mother. He said: "So here's to William and Catherine – and to those who travel with them as, I hope, they wearily reach for a celebratory G&T on the homebound plane. Between sips they might even muse on the strangeness of a job that mixes so many privileges with so much behind-the-scenes white-knuckle drama."

He then wrote: "Whatever happens on tour, they'll always have one advantage over the Class of '92: if their royal bosses decide to kiss for the cameras, they probably won't make a hash of it. New memories indeed, and what better 90th birthday gift for the daughter of the last King-Emperor?"