Sir David Clementi, who in a recent report called for the BBC Trust to be scrapped, has been confirmed as the next chairman of the corporation.

The former deputy governor of the Bank of England suggested in a 2016 report scrapping the BBC Trust, and having the BBC run by a board composed of senior staff and independent members.

He will head the unitary board which will replace the BBC Trust on April 1, after the government adopted his recommendations.

The appointments board put his name to Prime Minister Theresa May, who confirmed the appointment.

"I am confident that Sir David will provide the strong leadership necessary for the BBC to remain the world's best broadcaster," said Culture Secretary Karen Bradley.

"Sir David will bring a wealth of experience to the role and was the strongest candidate in an extremely competitive and high-calibre field. He has extensive experience as a chairman in both the commercial and not-for-profit sector, and has a strong regulatory and business background. I am confident that under his direction, the nation's broadcaster will continue to go from strength to strength."

Clementi, 67, was recommended by Bradley ahead of two other candidates, former civil servant Dame Deirdre Hutton and John Makinson, the chair of publishers Penguin Random House.

The government adopted the recommendations of his report, in which he called the BBC Trust flawed, and for its powers of oversight to be handed to media regulator Ofcom.

Clementi is being paid £10,000 less than the BBC Trust chair role, which was held by former Financial Times chief executive Rona Fairhead and is being scrapped.