Apart from being an Olympic equestrian, Zara Tindall, daughter of Princess Anne and the eldest granddaughter of Queen Elizabeth II, has excellent skills on canvas as well.

Zara Tindall revealed her hidden talent of painting while helping raise funds for National Health Service, who are working on the frontline in the United Kingdom to battle coronavirus pandemic. The equestrian painted her horse named Toytown on canvas and auctioned it off to raise funds for coronavirus relief efforts, reports Hello!

The artwork shows Zara's royal steed on the backdrop of a green and blue background and features a signature of the royal. The money earned from the auction will go to Equestrian Relief, the charity which is currently raising money to support NHS warriors.

As people practice self-isolation and social distancing in wake of the pandemic, the auction is being held online and will run until Tuesday. The highest bid at the time of writing is 3650 pounds.

Mike Tindall, Zara's husband and former rugby player, also took to Twitter to help raise funds for the charity and wrote: "Help Support the #NHS."

Earlier also, the father-of-two urged his followers to join the equestrian community in raising funds for the NHS charities.

Zara earlier made an appearance on "Good Morning Britain" via a video link to share her views on the COVID-19 crisis, and said: "I think it's hard being locked up and not being allowed to do what you normally do."

"You know getting fresh air into your lungs and being out and about is part of our staying active and staying fit," the 38-year-old added.

Zara, who stays with her husband Mike and their two young daughters Mia and Lena at her mother Princess Anne's Gatcombe Park estate in Gloucestershire, confessed that social distancing has been easier for them as compared to those in cities.

Queen at 90
Zara Phillips and Mike Tindall Ben Stansall/AFP

"We're very lucky. We're out in the country, we are on the farm, and we've still got to look after the horses. So I can't imagine how hard it is for people in the city. But trying to stay safe and not put pressure on our NHS," the Olympian admitted.