PS4 Pro Console 4K
The PS4 Pro console in an official Sony photo. Sony

Sony has lifted the lid on PS4 Pro: its more powerful, 4K-enabled PlayStation 4. Announced during Sony's PlayStation Meeting in New York, the product formerly known as PlayStation Neo will be released on 10 November for £349.

What exactly the console is has been revealed, so the question now is: what's the difference between it and the standard PS4 model?

All existing and future PS4 games will run on both machines, but the Pro will offer its users a significant upgrade in graphical fidelity thanks to its 4K support. It will also support HDR, but as of next week (12-16 September) every single PS4 will too, thanks to a free firmware update.

PS4 Pro is targeting hardcore gamers, those that "always a desire for advancement, and in this generation," according to president and global CEO of Sony Interactive Entertainment, Andrew House during the presser.

Hardcore gamers will want to know the specs. And here they are side by side.

PS4

PS4 Pro

CPU: 8 AMD Jaguar cores @ 1.6 GHz GPU: AMD GCN, 18 CUs @ 800 MHz, 1.84 Teraflops Memory: GDDR5 8GB, 176 GB/s

HDD: 500GB, 1TB

AV output: HDMI, Analog-AV out, Optical out

Wi-Fi: 2.4GHz

Power consumption: Up to 250 W

Dimensions: 275mm x 53mm x 305mm (2013 model)
265mm x 39mm x 288mm (Slim 2016 model)

CPU: 8 AMD Jaguar cores @ 2.1 GHz GPU: AMD GCN, 36 CUs @ 911 MHz, 4.20 Teraflops Memory: GDDR5 8GB, 218 GB/s

HDD: 1TB

AV output: HDMI, Optical out

Wi-Fi: 2.4GHz and 5GHz

Power consumption: Up to 310 W

Dimensions: 295mm x 55mm x 327mm

The big news is that PS4 Pro does not render in native 4K, but upscales to 4K. This will make it significantly easier for developers to make their games compatible with PS4 Pro and make use of its capabilities.

The fact the PS4 won't support Ultra Blu Ray discs is surprising, and also supports the notion that native 4K games will not be produced for the Pro. Native 4K games would require more disc space than is available on the current standard Blu Ray discs.

PS4 Pro will support 1080p visuals in its Share Play and Remote Play features, where the original PS4 only supports up to 720p. Multiplayer will run at a locked frame-rate across all PS4 models as to allow fair play.

HDR support is coming to all PS4 consoles as of mid-September.

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